Earlier this month, I was asked by Elizabeth Lorell, an excellent defense lawyer, to speak at a CLE conference sponsored by her law firm.  (You can read Elizabeth’s bio here.) The audience consisted of other defense lawyers, and insurance company claims representatives.  In other words, I was basically a snake at a mongoose convention.

I was saddened to learn that Judge Ruggero Aldisert, formerly of the Third Circuit, recently passed away.  I never had the privilege of appearing before Judge Aldisert, and I never met the man, but I feel indebted to him for writing two excellent books that were published through NITA:  “Logic for Lawyers” and “Winning on

My late Uncle Carmen was an accountant who worked for the IRS.  One tax season, I was grousing about how complicated the 1040 form could be. Uncle Carmen didn’t suffer fools gladly, and, with the veins bulging from his neck, insisted that NOTHING ON EARTH COULD BE SIMPLER.  My response was to engage in a

I’m reading a wonderful book right now called “Young Men and Fire,” by Norman Maclean.  The book is about a horrific forest fire that took place in Montana in 1949.  Amazing how small sparks can result in a conflagration beyond all belief.   Those of us involved in the litigation game are familiar with that problem. 

In ethics or metaphysics, the “law of unintended consequences” states that, for any willed action, there are consequences that occur which are not intended.  The concept has long existed, but was named and popularized in the 20th century by American sociologist Robert K. Merton.

Merton would have been fascinated by laws that were intended